Blog

USDA Study Shows That Beef’s Resource Use Do not Significantly Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions
A comprehensive study by ARS (Agricultural Research Services) on the environmental footprint of beef life cycle in the US was completed. The study concluded that cattle convert feed to food as efficiently, as pork and poultry, is not a large contributor to global warming. The goal of the study was to establish baseline measures that the U.S. beef industry can use to explore ways of reducing its environmental footprint and improve sustainability. “We found that the greenhouse gas emissions in our analysis were not all that different from what other credible studies had shown and were not a significant contributor...
USDA Study Shows That Beef’s Resource Use Do not Significantly Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions
A comprehensive study by ARS (Agricultural Research Services) on the environmental footprint of beef life cycle in the US was completed. The study concluded that cattle convert feed to food as efficiently, as pork and poultry, is not a large contributor to global warming. The goal of the study was to establish baseline measures that the U.S. beef industry can use to explore ways of reducing its environmental footprint and improve sustainability. “We found that the greenhouse gas emissions in our analysis were not all that different from what other credible studies had shown and were not a significant contributor...
USDA Study Shows That Beef’s Resource Use Do not Significantly Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions
A comprehensive study by ARS (Agricultural Research Services) on the environmental footprint of beef life cycle in the US was completed. The study concluded that cattle convert feed to food as efficiently, as pork and poultry, is not a large contributor to global warming. The goal of the study was to establish baseline measures that the U.S. beef industry can use to explore ways of reducing its environmental footprint and improve sustainability. “We found that the greenhouse gas emissions in our analysis were not all that different from what other credible studies had shown and were not a significant contributor...